How does Twitter help – just take a look.

May 11, 2009

So I have been pondering how to write this post for more than 4 weeks now – during March/April everyone I was talking to and emailing were considering the fate of Blogging during this age of Twitter and Facebook. Well, I for one, sure think that LinkedIN has it all over Facebook for serious business contacts and informal  learning opportunities – while Facebook connects people to those high school chums whom they have not spoken to for 25 years….and did not really need to reconnect to anyway.

So where is Twitter in my opinion – well, I have tried to ponder its possible use as (1) a learning delivery system, as (2) an ad-hoc un-conference creation system and (3) maybe just the telephone, but without long distance charges?

So in order to provide a little substance to my claim (which I am about to make) – I have captured just a smattering of 25 twitters from my measly collection, during the last 5 days – suffice it to say, I only follow 44 other people, which is a tiny amount in the scheme of things.  What I want to prove is that there is a really valuable thread out there in Twitter-Land if you simply look for it, and chuckle mildly at the posts about the pool overflowing, or the dog eating the dinner, or how little rain someone had in Orlando FL. Call that background information, as it’s not noise really – it just as flavor to the stories which are about to be told.

And below, look at the stories being asked about and told – truly, a better investment of my time each week than sitting through 4 hours of online graduate courses in order to get a PhD in Distance Learning or Applied Gaming or Strategic Management or whatever the case may be. There are some really insightful comments made in 160 characters, and some links which prove to be more valuable (and timely) than those contained in Newsweek, Fortune or Wired magazines (each of which cost money, but worst of all, they arrive late – after the news is breaking). Twitter gets you information as it happens, the Space Shuttle taking off (along with a link to a digital photo of course) or of the snow storm in Colorado. Or tweets from the audience of a conference you could not attend (thanks to tighter travel budgets). Really people, isn’t the electronic twitter of that factoid easier to read, save, use, share or utilize – than if you had travelled to Las Vegas to attend that conference in person?

So I wonder what you think of my stance. Facebook is for college kids wasting time, sharing pizza on 3rd floor, and maybe helping people borrow children’s outgrown clothing from teenage chums across town or the state or the US.  Twitter just might become an acknowledged learning platform for FAST, efficient and convenient distance learning.

 

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IDs deal w/ same data vs aesthetic stand-offs that visual designers do.
Just installed Twitteriffic 2.0 – some really great new features.
NECC “Unplugged” 09 – 3 days where anyone can present, on-site or virtual. 
About 14% of adult Americans have trouble reading. The rest are troubled about what they read.
Axpect Consulting says 56% of Fortune 500 will use serious games in 2009.
June Wired column on Wolfram Alpha is online now. One more chapter in Wolfram’s amazing career. 
NASA shuttle commander to tweet from space! 
The National Museum of Middle Ages in Paris is excellent.  Mostly everday life during 12th to 16th centuries.
“Why Don’t Students Like School: A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions About How the Mind Works and 
What It Means for the Classroom” (Hardcover, published March 2009)
“The Creative Entrepreneur: A DIY Visual Guidebook for Making Business Ideas Real” (Paperback, pub Nov 
2008)
Social Media is well on its way to enterprise mainstream.
There is sufficient heat around virtual worlds for the enterprise that I believe we’ll see a big uptick in exploration 
and adoption over the next 12-24 months.
I will also bang this old drum on both these items – that if we FAIL to think differently about the learning 
opportunities that we can redesign using Social Media and Virtual Worlds, then we would be outright stupid to 
expect any kind of enhanced ROI from those activities. 
Faculty still need to think about knowledge, skills & values.
Pedagogy has to precede the technology.
Most people can multitask, but they’re not as effective as when they don’t (research says).
How is play different for adults, and how does that affect games for learning?
Games should allow us to discover something, not just win.
In designing learning games, most organizations don’t like people to be able to fail, yet failure’s a powerful lrng 
tool.
Better to fail in a game than in real life, hence such widespread military adoption of training games.
Essentially, it’s about teaching brainstorming, systematic evaluation, trial and observation, and honing each time.
Games are movies, books, and our own imagination braided together.
To make more engaging – connect with the learner’s reality (empathy).
Games are great for learning and assessing skills, more diff to make them for pure knowledge transfer, less fun 
too. 
Tighter budgets demand creative solutions–sometimes more money does not = better learning! 

IDs deal w/ same data vs aesthetic stand-offs that visual designers do.

Just installed Twitteriffic 2.0 – some really great new features.

NECC “Unplugged” 09 – 3 days where anyone can present, on-site or virtual. 

About 14% of adult Americans have trouble reading. The rest are troubled about what they read.

Axpect Consulting says 56% of Fortune 500 will use serious games in 2009.

June Wired column on Wolfram Alpha is online now. One more chapter in Wolfram’s amazing career. 

NASA shuttle commander to tweet from space! 

The National Museum of Middle Ages in Paris is excellent.  Mostly everday life during 12th to 16th centuries.

“Why Don’t Students Like School: A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions About How the Mind Works and What It Means for the Classroom” (Hardcover, published March 2009)

“The Creative Entrepreneur: A DIY Visual Guidebook for Making Business Ideas Real” (Paperback, pub Nov 2008)

Social Media is well on its way to enterprise mainstream.

There is sufficient heat around virtual worlds for the enterprise that I believe we’ll see a big uptick in exploration and adoption over the next 12-24 months.

I will also bang this old drum on both these items – that if we FAIL to think differently about the learning opportunities that we can redesign using Social Media and Virtual Worlds, then we would be outright stupid to expect any kind of enhanced ROI from those activities. 

Faculty still need to think about knowledge, skills & values.

Pedagogy has to precede the technology.

Most people can multitask, but they’re not as effective as when they don’t (research says).

How is play different for adults, and how does that affect games for learning?

Games should allow us to discover something, not just win.

In designing learning games, most organizations don’t like people to be able to fail, yet failure’s a powerful lrng tool.

Better to fail in a game than in real life, hence such widespread military adoption of training games.

Essentially, it’s about teaching brainstorming, systematic evaluation, trial and observation, and honing each time.

Games are movies, books, and our own imagination braided together.

To make more engaging – connect with the learner’s reality (empathy).

Games are great for learning and assessing skills, more diff to make them for pure knowledge transfer, less fun too. 

Tighter budgets demand creative solutions–sometimes more money does not = better learning!

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